Community Building Block

Affordable Housing

Successful community involvement looks like coming together as a community and neighborhood … to discover together what are the pressures and opportunities before us.

Eric Conklin
Leaven Community
Community Building Block

Affordable Housing

Successful community involvement looks like coming together as a community and neighborhood … to discover together what are the pressures and opportunities before us.

Eric Conklin Leaven Community

Creating Housing for People Who Need it Most

While many people and organizations work diligently every day to solve Oregon’s housing crisis, the daily growth in new residents and a long-term and systemic statewide housing supply shortage have made it increasingly difficult to ensure Oregonians have access to safe and affordable housing.

In the Portland region, only two of 24 neighborhoods have any rental housing affordable for a three-person household making 60 percent of the area median income (in 2017, Portland median family income was $86,771 a year). That means for Black, Latino, Native American and low-income households, almost no neighborhoods are affordable—leaving too many one paycheck or one illness away from homelessness.

Leaven Community, a local nonprofit striving to cultivate diverse, equitable and thriving places in the Cully neighborhood (a majority low-income district in Northeast Portland) is trying to disrupt the impact of gentrification and cultural erasure as Portland grows and changes.

To do this, Leaven Community established Common House, a physical space that brings people and organizations together to work on civic and livability issues, centering the concerns and solutions offered by marginalized communities including low-income households and people of color. The organization’s inclusive approach has resulted in small improvements to Portland’s affordable housing crisis, including local policy changes that legalized tiny homes—a sustainable, stable housing solution for many low-income residents.

The Leaven Community’s work shines a brighter light on the power and impact of community-led organizing and advocacy.

Creating Housing for People Who Need it Most

While many people and organizations work diligently every day to solve Oregon’s housing crisis, the daily growth in new residents and a long-term and systemic statewide housing supply shortage have made it increasingly difficult to ensure Oregonians have access to safe and affordable housing.

In the Portland region, only two of 24 neighborhoods have any rental housing affordable for a three-person household making 60 percent of the area median income (in 2017, Portland median family income was $86,771 a year). That means for Black, Latino, Native American and low-income households, almost no neighborhoods are affordable—leaving too many one paycheck or one illness away from homelessness.

Leaven Community, a local nonprofit striving to cultivate diverse, equitable and thriving places in the Cully neighborhood (a majority low-income district in Northeast Portland) is trying to disrupt the impact of gentrification and cultural erasure as Portland grows and changes.

To do this, Leaven Community established Common House, a physical space that brings people and organizations together to work on civic and livability issues, centering the concerns and solutions offered by marginalized communities including low-income households and people of color. The organization’s inclusive approach has resulted in small improvements to Portland’s affordable housing crisis, including local policy changes that legalized tiny homes—a sustainable, stable housing solution for many low-income residents.

The Leaven Community’s work shines a brighter light on the power and impact of community-led organizing and advocacy.

Creating Housing for People Who Need it Most

While many people and organizations work diligently every day to solve Oregon’s housing crisis, the daily growth in new residents and a long-term and systemic statewide housing supply shortage have made it increasingly difficult to ensure Oregonians have access to safe and affordable housing.

In the Portland region, only two of 24 neighborhoods have any rental housing affordable for a three-person household making 60 percent of the area median income (in 2017, Portland median family income was $86,771 a year). That means for Black, Latino, Native American and low-income households, almost no neighborhoods are affordable—leaving too many one paycheck or one illness away from homelessness.

Leaven Community, a local nonprofit striving to cultivate diverse, equitable and thriving places in the Cully neighborhood (a majority low-income district in Northeast Portland) is trying to disrupt the impact of gentrification and cultural erasure as Portland grows and changes.

To do this, Leaven Community established Common House, a physical space that brings people and organizations together to work on civic and livability issues, centering the concerns and solutions offered by marginalized communities including low-income households and people of color. The organization’s inclusive approach has resulted in small improvements to Portland’s affordable housing crisis, including local policy changes that legalized tiny homes—a sustainable, stable housing solution for many low-income residents.

The Leaven Community’s work shines a brighter light on the power and impact of community-led organizing and advocacy.

Get the full report

Tracking Oregon's Progress (TOP) is a joint effort of Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) and Oregon State University (OSU) to track Oregon's economic, social and environmental progress. The full 2018 TOP Report includes 'How to Mobilize Communities' and 'Reflections on Community-Driven Solutions.'

Get the full report

Tracking Oregon's Progress (TOP) is a joint effort of Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) and Oregon State University (OSU) to track Oregon's economic, social and environmental progress. The full 2018 TOP Report includes 'How to Mobilize Communities' and 'Reflections on Community-Driven Solutions.'