Community Building Block

Food Security

The leaders within this community are fearless and relentless...incredible leaders that have risen out of these challenges and are determined to see change happen.

Taylor West
Marion-Polk Food Share
Community Building Block

Food Security

The leaders within this community are fearless and relentless...incredible leaders that have risen out of these challenges and are determined to see change happen.

Taylor West Marion-Polk Food Share

Promoting Health and Food Security

Despite having some of the richest agricultural areas in the nation, too many Oregon families and children lack long-term access to healthy, nutritious food needed to survive and thrive.

In the tight-knit community of Grand Ronde, which encompasses the Grand Ronde Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, nearly one-quarter of the population is American Indian or Alaska Native. Nearly 13 percent of Grand Ronde households are food insecure and do not have access to a local grocery store, and in a 2016 community survey, 80 percent of respondents reported traveling over 10 miles to get food, a difficulty for many lower-income and elderly community members who rely on sometimes unreliable and time-intensive public transportation.

Recognizing the importance of access to fresh, healthy food, the Grand Ronde Tribal Council partnered with Marion-Polk Food Share (MPFS), a nearby nonprofit charged with ending hunger, increasing food security and strengthening the community food system in Marion and Polk counties.

As a member of the Oregon Food Bank Network, MPFS facilitates community-based teams to better understand community needs and identify barriers to food access In 2014, the Tribal Council invested in a local food pantry called Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws that made food more accessible for community members. The new pantry provided an opportunity for a closer partnership between the Tribal Council and MPFS, and together with direction from the Tribal employee leadership team, the organizations co-developed a workshop to bring community members together to talk about creating a more resilient community food system.

As a staple workshop, Food, Education, Agriculture Solutions Together (FEAST) honors how the Tribe’s relationship with food is related to cultural harvest practices and provides resources to help community members learn how to access and grow fresh food.

Today, Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws is a bustling community hub where people connect, exchange information and access food. It serves as a thoughtful example of how cross-organizational partnerships can foster community resiliency.

Promoting Health and Food Security

Despite having some of the richest agricultural areas in the nation, too many Oregon families and children lack long-term access to healthy, nutritious food needed to survive and thrive.

In the tight-knit community of Grand Ronde, which encompasses the Grand Ronde Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, nearly one-quarter of the population is American Indian or Alaska Native. Nearly 13 percent of Grand Ronde households are food insecure and do not have access to a local grocery store, and in a 2016 community survey, 80 percent of respondents reported traveling over 10 miles to get food, a difficulty for many lower-income and elderly community members who rely on sometimes unreliable and time-intensive public transportation.

Recognizing the importance of access to fresh, healthy food, the Grand Ronde Tribal Council partnered with Marion-Polk Food Share (MPFS), a nearby nonprofit charged with ending hunger, increasing food security and strengthening the community food system in Marion and Polk counties.

As a member of the Oregon Food Bank Network, MPFS facilitates community-based teams to better understand community needs and identify barriers to food access In 2014, the Tribal Council invested in a local food pantry called Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws that made food more accessible for community members. The new pantry provided an opportunity for a closer partnership between the Tribal Council and MPFS, and together with direction from the Tribal employee leadership team, the organizations co-developed a workshop to bring community members together to talk about creating a more resilient community food system.

As a staple workshop, Food, Education, Agriculture Solutions Together (FEAST) honors how the Tribe’s relationship with food is related to cultural harvest practices and provides resources to help community members learn how to access and grow fresh food.

Today, Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws is a bustling community hub where people connect, exchange information and access food. It serves as a thoughtful example of how cross-organizational partnerships can foster community resiliency.

Promoting Health and Food Security

Despite having some of the richest agricultural areas in the nation, too many Oregon families and children lack long-term access to healthy, nutritious food needed to survive and thrive.

In the tight-knit community of Grand Ronde, which encompasses the Grand Ronde Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon, nearly one-quarter of the population is American Indian or Alaska Native. Nearly 13 percent of Grand Ronde households are food insecure and do not have access to a local grocery store, and in a 2016 community survey, 80 percent of respondents reported traveling over 10 miles to get food, a difficulty for many lower-income and elderly community members who rely on sometimes unreliable and time-intensive public transportation.

Recognizing the importance of access to fresh, healthy food, the Grand Ronde Tribal Council partnered with Marion-Polk Food Share (MPFS), a nearby nonprofit charged with ending hunger, increasing food security and strengthening the community food system in Marion and Polk counties.

As a member of the Oregon Food Bank Network, MPFS facilitates community-based teams to better understand community needs and identify barriers to food access In 2014, the Tribal Council invested in a local food pantry called Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws that made food more accessible for community members. The new pantry provided an opportunity for a closer partnership between the Tribal Council and MPFS, and together with direction from the Tribal employee leadership team, the organizations co-developed a workshop to bring community members together to talk about creating a more resilient community food system.

As a staple workshop, Food, Education, Agriculture Solutions Together (FEAST) honors how the Tribe’s relationship with food is related to cultural harvest practices and provides resources to help community members learn how to access and grow fresh food.

Today, Iskam MǝkʰMǝk-Haws is a bustling community hub where people connect, exchange information and access food. It serves as a thoughtful example of how cross-organizational partnerships can foster community resiliency.

Get the full report

Tracking Oregon's Progress (TOP) is a joint effort of Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) and Oregon State University (OSU) to track Oregon's economic, social and environmental progress. The full 2018 TOP Report includes 'How to Mobilize Communities' and 'Reflections on Community-Driven Solutions.'

Get the full report

Tracking Oregon's Progress (TOP) is a joint effort of Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) and Oregon State University (OSU) to track Oregon's economic, social and environmental progress. The full 2018 TOP Report includes 'How to Mobilize Communities' and 'Reflections on Community-Driven Solutions.'